Month: March 2018

Plural endings for masculine nouns

Plural endings for masculine nouns

Most take -e or -e ¨ endings Most masculine nouns take -e or -e ¨ in their plural forms: -e or → der Arm – die Arme der Schuh – die Schuhe -e der Ball – die Bälle der Fuß – die Füße In addition, there are two more main plural endings for masculine nouns: no ending → der Onkel – die Onkel der Spiegel – die Spiegel or + umlaut der Apfel – die Äpfel der Vater – die Väter -(e)n → This ending applies t... »

Plural endings for feminine nouns

Plural endings for feminine nouns

Most take -(e)n Most feminine nouns take the plural ending -(e)n. This applies to all nouns ending in -e, -ei, -heit, -ion, -keit, -schaft, -tät, -ung or -ur: -(e)n  die Blume – die Blumen die Bäckerei – die Bäckereien die Tasche – die Taschen die Zeitung – die Zeitungen In addition, there are two more commonly used endings with feminine nouns: -e + → This ending applies to many feminine nouns con... »

Plural endings for neuter nouns

Plural endings for neuter nouns

Most take -e Here are the three main plural endings for neuter nouns: -e → This ending is the most common with neuter nouns: das Bein – die Beine das Jahr – die Jahre das Regal – die Regale das Stück – die Stücke -er or ¨ (when possible) → das Kind – die Kinder das Kleid – die Kleider das Gehalt– die Gehälter das Glas – die Gläser no change → There is no change for most neuter nouns ending in -el,... »

All three genders have some plural endings with -s. However, this type of ending is mainly used for words imported from foreign languages, in abbreviations and names: das Hotel → die Hotels der PC → die PCs Herr und Frau Schmidt → die Schmidts Foreign nouns which don’t add an -s in the plural include: der Manager → die Manager, der Computer → die Computer. Also note that words from the English whi... »

Plural endings in the dative

Plural endings in the dative

Plurals in the dative case normally add the letter -n wherever this is possible. Die Bäume sind grün. → Sie liegen unter den Bäumen. The plural endings in -s stay the same: Mit so vielen Autos hatte niemand gerechnet ‘Nobody had reckoned with that many cars’. Nouns used in the plural only Note that some German nouns are used only in their plural form. They include: Eltern ‘parents’, Ferien ‘holida... »

German nouns – three genders

German nouns – three genders

What are nouns? Nouns are words used to name living creatures, objects, abstract qualities or concepts: German nouns – three genders In German, all nouns are classed as having one of three genders: masculine, feminine or neuter and are written with an initial capital letter. In dictionaries, the gender is usually indicated with m for masculine nouns, f for feminine nouns and nt for neuter nouns. W... »

Endings indicating the gender

Endings indicating the gender

Masculine endings The following endings usually indicate that the noun is masculine: An exception is das Labor ‘laboratory’. Feminine endings Some exceptions are: das Sofa ‘sofa’, das Genie ‘genius’, das Abitur ‘A levels’. Note that about 90 per cent of nouns ending in -e are also feminine: Exceptions include: das Auge ‘eye’, das Interesse ‘interest’, der Käse ‘cheese’, der Name ‘name’, and all ma... »

Groups of nouns

Groups of nouns

There are also certain groups of nouns, usually linked by meaning, which tend to be masculine or feminine or neuter: »

Compound nouns

Compound nouns

The last noun defines the gender – Compound nouns usually consist of two or more nouns. The gender is defined by the last noun: der Computer + das Spiel → das Computerspiel der Bauch + der Tanz + die Lehrerin → die Bauchtanzlehrerin Adding -s When joining noun + noun together an extra -s is often inserted to link the components and to make the pronunciation easier. This usually happens when ... »

Nouns in use

Nouns in use

Determiners and nouns Determiners and nouns When used in sentences, nouns normally appear with determiners such as der, die, das etc. Depending on the function of the noun within the sentence the determiners can change. For example, the definite articles der, die, das and die for plural nouns are used when the noun is the subject of a sentence (nominative case). These articles change to dem, der, ... »